Beagle Bundle

Find out if your Beagle could develop an inherited disease at CAGT.

Select at least two tests from the selection below to build a bundle of your choice at discounted rates.

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome

Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency

Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration

CODE BE_BUNDLE
Category
Breed(s)
Aliases

Overview

A number of test are available for the Beagle. Two or more of these tests purchased as part of this bundle will be discounted.

  1. Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency associated with the F7 gene
  2. Musladin-Lueke Syndrome associated with the ADAMTSL2 gene
  3. Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration (NCCD) associated with the SPTBN2

Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency

Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency is an inherited blood clotting disorder. Factor VII (F7) is a protein essential for blood clotting. A deficiency causes frequent nosebleeds, excessive bruising and excessive or prolonged bleeding after an injury or surgery. Affected dogs may not show clinical signs until they undergo surgery and excessive bleeding occurs.

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome (MLS) is an inherited disorder in which dogs have increased amounts of connective tissue in their joints and skin. Clinical signs are usually obvious from birth. Signs include stiff, sometimes contracted joints that cause dogs to walk upright and often on their tip-toes, giving them a “ballerina walk”. Affected dogs are smaller than littermates with creased ears and thick, tight skin. Other features of this disorder include short outer toes, broad flat foreheads with wide-set slanted eyes and high-set ears. Dogs may also exhibit a failure to thrive, have seizures or experience “phantom pains”. The disease progresses for the first year of life, and then clinical signs stabilise. Affected dogs typically have a normal lifespan, but often develop arthritis.

Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration

Cerebellar cortical degeneration, also known as cerebellar abiotrophy, is a disease characterised by clinical signs of cerebellar dysfunction, such as ataxia-dysmetria, broad based stance, loss of balance and intentional tremors. Affected puppies start showing clinical signs around 3 weeks of age. They are slower and less coordinated than unaffected puppies, falling more often and unable to walk in a correct manner. Signs include tremor, ataxia (inability to coordinate the movement of muscles) and spastic paralysis.