Dachshund (Miniature Long Haired) Bundle

Find out if your Miniature Long Haired Dachshund could develop an inherited disease at CAGT.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA5 type)

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (CORD1 type)

CODE MLHD_BUNDLE
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Overview

A number of tests are available for the Miniature Long Haired Dachshund. Two or more of these tests purchased as part of this bundle will be discounted.

  1. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA5 type) associated with the NECAP1 gene
  2. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (CORD1-type) associated with the RPGRIP1 gene

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA5 type)

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is the most common form of inherited disease affecting the retina in dogs. Genetically different forms of PRA, caused by mutations in different genes, affect many breeds of dog with each form usually affecting one or a small number of breeds. PRA is characterised by progressive degeneration of the retina at the back of the eye and leads to vision loss and blindness. In most knowns forms of PRA the rod cells of the retina degenerate first, resulting in a loss of dim light vision initially. This specific form of PRA is caused by a mutation in a gene called NECAP1 and is indistinguishable from other forms of PRA in other breeds. The average age of onset of clinical signs is around 4 years, but can be anything between 1 and 12 years. This variant was originally identified in the Giant Schnauzer, but has also been found in other breeds of German ancestry, including the Miniature Long Haired Dachshund.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (CORD1-type)

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is the most common form of inherited disease affecting the retina in dogs. Genetically different forms of PRA, caused by mutations in different genes, affect many breeds of dog with each form usually affecting one or a small number of breeds. PRA is characterised by progressive degeneration of the retina at the back of the eye and leads to vision loss and blindness. In most knowns forms of PRA the rod cells of the retina degenerate first, resulting in a loss of dim light vision initially. In this specific form of PRA the cone cells of the retina degenerate first, followed by the rod cells (cone rod dystrophy), so dogs affected with CORD1 do not develop night blindless first. As with all dogs suffering from PRA, there is no cure. Dogs generally adapt quite well to blindness – especially when it develops gradually – as long as their surroundings remain familiar (e.g. furniture does not get rearranged, they do not move house etc).