Irish Setter Bundle

Find out if your Irish Setter could develop an inherited disease at CAGT.

Select at least two tests from the selection below to build a bundle of your choice at discounted rates.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (RCD4 type)

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (RCD1 type)

CODE IS_BUNDLE
Category
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Overview

A number of tests are available for the Irish Setter. Two or more of these tests purchased as part of this bundle will be discounted.

  1. Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I associated with the ITGB2 gene
  2. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (RCD4-type) associated with the PCARE gene
  3. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (RCD1 type) associated with the PDE6B gene

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I

Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) is an immunodeficiency disorder in dogs, caused by a defect of the white blood cells (leucoctyes). This defect means that the immune system cannot respond appropriately to infections. The disease is characterised by severe, recurrent bacterial infections. The first signs of CLAD DNA test at Canine Genetic Testing appear in puppies, around the age of 13 weeks. Signs include recurrent infections, fever, poor appetite, poor growth, impaired would healing and enlarged lymph nodes. Clinical signs progress and affected dogs generally die by the age of six months.
This form of the disease has been identified in Iris Setters, Irish Red and White Setters and cross breed dogs.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (RCD4-type)

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is the most common form of inherited disease affecting the retina in dogs; the retina detects light and sends images to the brain. Progressive degeneration of the retina at the back of the eye is characteristic of PRA and leads to vision loss and blindness. PRA is not painful to dogs, and the first signs of the disease tend to be bumping in to objects, such as a piece of furniture that has been moved. Mutations in different genes cause genetically different forms of PRA. It affects many different breeds of dog , but each genetically distinct form usually affects one or a small number of breeds.

This form of progressive retinal atrophy in the Irish setter is caused by a mutation in a gene called PCARE (previously known as C2ORF71) and is indistinguishable from other forms of PRA in other breeds. It is also found in a number of other breeds. The average age of onset of clinical signs is quite late, around 10 years, but can be anything between 5 and 12 years. In humans, mutations in PCARE are associated with a condition known as Retinitis Pigmentosa, symptoms of which include loss of peripheral vision and the ability to see at night. There is no cure for this form of PRA, but using the DNA test to identify dogs that carry the mutation in PCARE will prevent further spread of this blinding condition in this lovely breed.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (RCD1 type)

This specific form of PRA is caused by a mutation in a gene called PDE6B and is indistinguishable from other forms of PRA in other breeds. The average age of onset of clinical signs is very early, around one month, and by 5 months of ages dogs are completely blind. In humans, mutations in PDE6B are associated with a condition known as Retinitis Pigmentosa and congenital stationary night blindness, symptoms of which include loss of peripheral vision and the ability to see at night. There is no cure for this form of PRA, but using the DNA test to identify dogs that carry the mutation in PDE6B will prevent further spread of this blinding condition in this lovely breed.