Australian Cattle Dog Bundle

Find out if your Australian Cattle Dog could develop an inherited disease at CAGT.

Select at least two tests from the selection below to build a bundle of your choice at discounted rates.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Primary Lens Luxation

CODE ACD_BUNDLE
Category
Breed(s)
Aliases

Overview

A number of tests are available for the Australian Cattle Dog. Two or more of these tests purchased as part of this bundle will be discounted.

  1. Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis associated with the CLN5 gene
  2. Primary Lens Luxation associated with the ADAMTS17 gene

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease found in dogs, humans, and other animals. It is characterised by the widespread accumulation of lipopigment in neurovisceral tissue and clinical signs of neurological disease. Onset of clinical signs of this form of NCL in Border collies can be from 15 months, but the age of onset of the disease is variable. Affected dogs develop ataxia and psychological abnormalities, including agitations, aggression, hallucinations, and hyperactivity. The disease is progressive and most dogs will lose the ability to coordinate functions such as house training, walking and eating. There is no treatment or cure, and as a result, affected dogs seldom live beyond 28 months of age.

Primary Lens Luxation

Primary lens luxation (PLL) is a painful and potentially blinding inherited eye disease that typically affects dogs between 3 and 8 years of age and in many breeds is caused by a single nucleotide substitution in the ADAMTS17 gene.
PLL is the term given to the spontaneous displacement or movement of the lens from its normal position within the eye, as a result of rupture of the lens zonules that hold the lens in its normal position. The zonules are a network of tiny fibres that attach the edge of the lens to the ciliary muscle that circles the eye, in the same way that springs attach a trampoline to its frame. Following zonule rupture the lens usually moves to the anterior chamber at the front to the eye where it can cause damage and rapid onset glaucoma by obstructing the drainage of fluid out of the eye resulting in an increase of pressure within the eye. Glaucoma can cause irreversible vision loss if not treated quickly. PLL is invariably bilateral (occurs in both eyes), although a period of several weeks or months might separate luxation of the two lenses. Clinical signs of PLL include sudden onset of eye pain, clouding of the cornea (the front of the eye will look blue), redness of the “white” of the eye and a reluctance to exercise. PLL should be considered an emergency and veterinary assistance sought immediately.
Lens Luxation can also occur secondary to other primary eye disorders, including primary glaucoma, cataracts, inflammation and trauma.