Parson Russell Terrier Bundle

Find out if your Parson Russell Terrier could develop an inherited disease at CAGT.

Select at least two tests from the selection below to build a bundle of your choice at discounted rates.

Late Onset Ataxia

Primary Lens Luxation

Spinocerebellar Ataxia (Russell Terrier type)

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Overview

A number of test are available for Parson Russell Terriers. Two or more of these tests purchased as part of this bundle will be discounted.

  1. Late Onset Ataxia
  2. Primary Lens Luxation
  3. Spinocerebellar Ataxia (Russell Terrier Type)

Late Onset Ataxia

Late onset ataxia, otherwise known as spinocerebellar ataxia in the Parson Russell Terrier affects young dogs, usually around the age of 6-12 months. Initially the dogs’ owners may notice their dog is not very well coordinated, with hind limb swaying when walking, and difficulty in climbing stairs and jumping. As the disease progresses, a characteristic ‘prancing’ or ‘dancing’ type of gait develops, especially affecting the hind limbs. Severely affected animals frequently fall and have difficulty returning to a standing position. In most affected dogs the disease progresses with dogs finding it increasingly difficult to walk.

Primary Lens Luxation

Primary lens luxation (PLL) is a painful and potentially blinding inherited eye disease that typically affects dogs between 3 and 8 years of age. PLL  is caused by a single nucleotide substitution in the ADAMTS17 gene and is found in many breeds, including the Parson Russell Terrier.

Spinocerebellar Ataxia (Russell Terrier Type)

Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA) is an early onset, inherited neurologic disease affecting dogs. Affected dogs typically present with incoordination and loss of balance between 2 to 6 months of age. The disease is progressive with affected dogs developing a “prancing” gait and often falling. With this form of ataxia dogs may also have episodes of muscle twitching and rigidity that can appear like seizures but dogs are aware of their surroundings during these attacks. The episodes of muscle twitching get worse with age and dogs are at risk of overheating. Affected dogs can also experience true epileptic seizures.